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. welcome to our viewers around the world. has the cnn special report on the ongoing crisis in japan. i'm don lemon. >> hello. over the next hour, an indepth look at the unbelievable tragedy that unfolded in japan in recent weeks, from the first tremors to a crushing tsunami, to the brink of a nuclear meltdown. >> and also the latest fallout from japan's nuclear disabled plant, and radiation exposure to the public and food supply. >> but first we have a disturbing story developing out of libya. >> there's video of an hysterical woman bursting into a tripoli hotel filled with journalists. her name is iman and she is screaming a horrifying story accusing 15 members of the militia of raping and beating her over a two-day movement. >> they moved to shut her up. all the while dragging her away from uncertain fate. they smashed cameras, including ours, trying to destroy the evidence. we did get this video of it. let's get to nick robertson who is staying at that hotel for more. >> reporter: the lady came into the hotel this morning. she was screaming. she was a middle aged woman. she seemed f
of miyagi prefecture as well. some towns in japan are running out of coffins and body bags. one town was completely flattened, among the dead people who could not get out of their hospital beds. 1700 residents still missing. but in the middle of all of this destruction, an amazing rescue. an elderly man alive. he was found alive and he survived three days under rubble in miyagi, japan. rescuers scaried him out today. msnbc's chris jansing has made her way to tokyo, there live for us. chris, what are you seeing? >> reporter: well, i have to tell you, when you see that video of the one man being rescued you see there are a few glimmers of hope here. but they are indeed few and far between. the scenes have been absolutely unrelenting devastation. 1,000 bodies, as you said, washing up on one shoreline. they had been washed into the sea bi-the huge waves of the tsunami and are now coming back up. and in town after town after town in the northeast we are seeing millions of people who are about to spend their fourth night, it's 11:00 p.m. here in japan, without heat, without electricity, an
the hard-hit area in northern japan. he just learned his mother is alive and so is his sister, who's still trapped at her workplace in sendai. >> how do you feel now? >> i'm just happy kind of. >> you feel relieved, i imagine. >> yeah, relieved. >> but it's bittersweet because he says so many others have lost so much. thelma gutierrez, cnn, los angeles. >>> top of the hour, a look at the top stories. help is coming from all directions to earthqua earthquake-devastated japan. these are search dog teams arriving from south korea. u.s. military ships are delivering food and relief supplies and a british rescue team is scheduled to arrive on sunday with heavy lifting equipment and 150 rescue experts and search dogs from virginia and california are on their way to japan to help right now. >>> a few people have tested positive for radiation exposure according to a report on japanese public television. they were near a nuclear facility when something inside the plant exploded shortly after the earthquake. government officials say the reactor itself was not damaged. >>> and hawaii is moving to get
comments@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, emergency workers return to japan's crippled nuclear plant after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but
>>> the sun will be rising soon over japan. day two since the country's biggest ever earthquake flattened cities and cents a tsunami smashing into the coast. of course it's too soon to hammer down a death toll, but japanese television reports that more than 900 people are dead. that figure doesn't include casualties in hard-hit areas not yet reached by rescue crews. in one coastal town about half the population is still unaccounted for and that's about 9500 men, women and children. >>> meantime, a few people have actually tested positive for radiation exposure according to a report on japanese public television. they were near a nuclear facility when something exploded shortly after the earthquake. government officials say the reactor itself was not damaged. >> and in some japanese towns today, no two ways to say it. the destruction is complete. nearly no structure is standing. nearly no car is right side up. people we have talked to say they felt strong aftershocks throughout the night. so one of those correspondents just arriving in tokyo within the past 24 or so is martin sav
>>> utter devastation. there really is no other way to describe what's left of northern japan. the prime minister calls it the worst crisis since world war ii. half the people in one town are missing. now japan's bracing for what could be the next disaster. meltdown fears as two squak-damaged reactors. >>> there is some hope amid this catastrophe. separated families are being reunited. rescue teams from around the world are arriving in full force. >>> from cnn's world headquarters in atlanta, it's march 13th. i'm randi kai. . >> i'm andrew stevens in hong kong. we would like to welcome our viewers from around the world. >> as japan tries to recover from that powerful quake and tsunami, there are growing fears today. the country could be hit with a nuclear disaster. first, a quick update on the human scope of this disaster. the official death toll, now 977, 739 missing, but those figures, of course, expected to rise. one regional police official says the deaths in his area alone, quoet, will undoubtedly be in the thousands. thousands are missing. more than 200,000 people who li
japan and the pacific, triggering a gigantic tsunami. entire islands wiped out. look at these incredible pictures of the giant wave as it rushes inland. buildings swept off their foundations. rivers changing direction. sweeping away cars, boats and people. the entire west coast, under a tsunami warning at this hour. this is a special edition of "good morning america," "tsunami in the pacific." >>> and good morning, america. that earthquake that hit japan overnight is just devastating. the largest in japan's history. 1,000-times more powerful than the quake that hit new zealand almost 3 weeks ago. the strongest in the world since the indian ocean earthquake of 2004. spider jets have been deployed to inspect quake damage. the entire country is under a state of emergency because of a failing power plant there. it is devastating. >> the magnitude of the earthquake was 8.9. it is huge. the biggest earthquake on record since they started keeping records in the early 1800s in japan. it's been followed by at least 19 massive aftershocks. many of which have been over 6.0 themselves. there are rep
to be riveting, we appreciate your morning. it's monday just after 9 a.m. hour and now japan's stock market open for trading and investors watching closely, with serious concerns about the impact worldwide, the nikkei average fell nearly 2% and more losses expected for monday and if the disaster potentially costing billions of dollars in insurance losses, could that affect our insurance premiums at home. the fox business network's robert gray watching the markets. >> they're watching where they left off and keep in mind the quake hitting before the close of trading on friday and didn't have a full day to basically factor this into the shares and the nuclear opening just minutes ago at the top of the hour there. it's down 2.1% now, as more of the shares are traded. there was a flood of sell orders and big names talking sony, talking about nissan, honda, toyota that it was not fully impacted and now seeing the nikkei down about 4% and losses in new zealand and australia the first two markets to open on monday. they were down, but now the nikkei down 4% here and we're also seeing the dollar taking
are homeless. >>i think it's very likely that the tsunami that hit japan will kill considerably more people than the nuclear reactor accident will. >> in los angeles, the county health officer warned u.s. citizens against taking iodine as a precaution saying this's no risk of in-- there's no risk of increased radiation. >>> every day the situation in japan gets worse and worse. we get to see it. help is coming from all around the world. even places here in baltimore are doing what they can to give aid to the victims in japan. sherrie johnson is live to explain how you can get involved. sherrie. >> reporter: this wegmans here in hunt valley are certainly doing their part to help those victims of the earthquake in japan. the store just opened a half- hour ago. and customers are coming in. they have the opportunity to donate money once they get to the cash register to check out. one hundred percent of the donations will get to the red cross relief fun for the japan earthquake and tsunami relief fund. all the wegmans stores will accept donation. they have announced a $100,000 donation to help e
the will and the determination to come back after something like this, it is japan. and we'd like to encourage you to help them. they need it. we've made it really easy for you. just go to our web page cnn.com/impact. >>> and now it's time for me to pass it over to brooke baldwin. brooke, you can't help but want to help these people when you look at these images? >> absolutely. cnn.com/impact. thank you, randi. >>> i want to begin this newscast today with an image i cannot shake. an entire village wiped out in 90 seconds. 90 seconds for the ocean to swell and overtake this one town while those who live there, those who had moved quickly enough, watched from higher ground. watch this with me. >> doesn't that just take your breath away? imagine you're one of the fortunate perched atop this hill watching your home, your town, people scrambling in the bottom left watching it all being wiped away. that was friday in miyagi prefecture. the twin forces in that tsunami were just the beginning. look at this. we have the satellite photo from digital globe and it shows the damage to the reactors at the fukushima daiichi
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
, good night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >> bret: japan deals with environmental crisis following the earthquake and tsunami. will potential nuclear disaster there affect growing reliance for energy over here? and republican leaders try to keep the members in line long enough to avoid a government shutdown. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm bret baier. japan is coping with multiple disasters tonight. the japanese prime minister says if the catastrophe unseen since the end of world war ii. millions of people have little or no food, water, or heat in the freezing temperatures. following friday's earthquake and tsunami. nearly 1900 are confirmed dead but estimates for a final tally run much higher, with thousands more missing. explosions and exposed fuel rods at nuclear facilities heightened fear of full-scale meltdown. correspondent adam housley is in japan tonight. >> fears of a worst case scenario grip a nation that's shaken and battered from friday's 9.0 earthquake, subsequent tsunami and continual aftershocks. n
in japan. this is new video of when the powerful tsunami hit. watch this. a tsunami wave swallowing up this town. water rushing over homes, sending them splintering into pieces. over on top of their buildings. homes ripped from their foundation sending down a river of destruction. that's awesome in its powerfulness to watch. fears of a nuclear meltdown after this explosion rocked the fukushima nuclear plants. they continue yet again today. good morning. good to have you along with us. welcome, allison. >> the images out of japan are jaw dropping. this is a buddhist temple rocking back and forth from the sheer jolt of the quake. rescue and relief efforts are now underway. millions of people are left without food, water and electricity for days. japanese officials near thousands of people may be dead. bill: we have julian from sendai in northern japan where the tsunami came onshore near this nuclear power plants. what's the latest from there? >> i have been down by the sendai airport watching the japanese military collecting body parts from the paddy fields around the airport. the power
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
>>> utter testimony devastation. no other way to describe what's left of northern japan. coastlines littered with what the tsunami left behind. japan's bracing for what could be the next disaster. meltdown fears at two quake-damaged reactors. >> some hope, though, amid the catastrophe, survivors pulled from the rubble and rooftops. separated families being reun e reunited and rescue teams arriving in full force. >>> millions of people are running short on food, clean water, gas, the basic necessities that have suddenly become so crucial. from cnn center in atlanta, march 13th. i'm randi kaye. >> and i'm andrew stevens in hong kong. we'd like to welcome viewers in the united states and from around the world to our continuing coverage of the disaster in japan. >> as japan tries to recover from the powerful quake and tsunami there, are growing fears today the country could be hit with a nuclear disaster. this is the actual moment of explosion at a nuclear plant in tu fukushima. sea water has been poured into the reactor to cool the fuel rods. about 160 people being tested for possible
in japan after an explosion at a nuclear power plant. it happened just a few hours ago. there is a desperate race against the clock as officials try to prevent that reactor from melting down. >>> two of japan's nuclear power plants are in a perilous situation now. there are 11 kilometers apart and on japan's eastern coast. both severely damaged by that 8.9 quake that hit the country on friday. >>> meanwhile, another breaking story to tell you about at this hour. take a look at this. a tour bus accident on i-95 in. bronx here in new york. the new york fire department has just confirmed at least 12 people are dead. as you can see, dozens of firefighters and police are there. a frightening scene. it appears this bus tipped over and the top of it slid through one of the posts that holds freeway signs. it appears to be a tour bus ever some kind. trying to learn more about this. as we get more information we'll bring that to you. so a very good morning to you. i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc saturday." we'll have more on the bus crash as it becomes available. >>> our other b
. >> a fox urgent, nuclear crisis in japan. i'm harris falkner, we're live with a special edition of fox report. a new threat of multiple reactor meltdowns and frantically trying to cool down the reactors with sea water and are' looking at the two plants in question, fukushima where there's been at least one explosion and the other, where we're getting word now radiation levels have dropped back to normal after what they're doing there for the problem. japan's prime minister speaking about friday's twin disasters, the earthquake and tsunami and now the nuclear threat. his words through a translator. >> 65 years after the end of world war ii, this is the toughers and most difficult for japan in that period. >> harris: we're just starting to get some satellite images. this is sendai, the epicenter of the quake. before on the left side of the screen and after. you can see how a torrent of tsunami driven mud ripped through the covered ground here. the government confirming now more than 2500 buildings in that city destroyed. scientists have just revised their estimates now how big that earth
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
. >>> time is 5:306789 parts of japan hit by a earthquake and flat nd by a tsunami, a third risk looms. a third reactor is now leaking high levels of radiation and a fourth has caught fire. here's what one official is saying about the threat. >> now we are talking about levels that can impact a human health. i would like all of you to embrace the information calmly. >> there are warnings now affecting 140,000 people in a 12-mile radius of the reauthors. 70,000 have been evacuated. test sites are checking people to see if they were exposed to radiation. in to beingo, 170 miles away, there are reports of slightly higher radiation levels, but officials say the levels are too small to threaten any one there. the japanese government is now asked the u.s. for nuclear help. eight more experts from the nuclear regulatory commission are now on their way to japan. >>> it's so hard to look at pictures and know they are real. if it's tough for us as adults to comprehend, imagine how hard it is trying to explane to your children. you -- explain to your children. you want to ease fierce and accurate
:00 now in japan. i want to direct you to our special earthquake section. at abc2news.com you can find all the latest information on this massive earthquake. then of course to the tsunami. now we're worried about radiation. it's spread from four reactors in the nuclear plant along japan's northeast coast. despite there have been some stories today of success. traffic stretched for miles. as panicked citizens try to flee the area surrounding the stricken fukushima nuclear facility. this man says nobody tells us, the citizens, what is really happening. fire broke out at the reactor number four while an explosion at reactor two prompted fears, cracks in the containment vessel allowed radioactive material to seep out. >> i think we're very close to the point of no return. they are not ready for the eventuality of an uncontrolled breach of containment. >> reporter: the situation is so serious officials did something they had not done up until this point. send most of their workers home. government officials immediately issued instructions, at the height of the exposure alarmingly high radiation
bye-bye. [ cheers and applause ] ♪ >>> this morning on "early today," high anxiety. japan pulls emergency workers from its crippled nuclear power plant after a surge in radiation. >>> dealing with disaster, a new study reveals how prepared is the u.s. to deal with a major nuclear emergency. >>> and ways of power, newly surfaced video shows the force of friday's tsunami as it hits the oregon coastline. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. welcome to our viewers across the nation, including the pacific time zone. i'm lynn berry. today, we begin with melting point. a skeleton crew working to prevent an all-out meltdown at the fukushima nuclear plant were forced out of the facility for nearly an hour today. it was following a dangerous spike in radiation that japanese authorities feared was a risk to workers' lives. nbc's dan shenaman reports. >> reporter: authorities in japan have worked to avert a tragedy. the work has centered on damage to the machine four reactor where spent rods were being stored in pools of water. sea water has been pumped
on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and toda
, but how does it end? >>> in japan, the disaster deepens with new problems at the nuclear plant. there are new fears about food safety and an american family has received the worst possible news about their daughter. our teams are on the ground. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. in addition to two wars on two other fronts, the united states military tonight is engaged against libya. the attacks are in the form of air strikes. 32 of them in just the last 24 hours. about half now being carried out by u.s. aircraft. and there have been 136 cruise missiles launched. only eight of them by british armed forces. the rest launched by the u.s. they have hit targets up and down the libyan coastline, mostly aimed at libyan defenses, so the coalition aircraft can begin enforcing that no-fly zone over a larger portion of the country. the united states says moammar gadhafi is not a target personally, but president obama says the u.s. acted in these attacks he launched from south america to stop gadhafi from firing on his own people. we
>>> right now on "andrea mitchell reports," president obama promising full support to japan as it tries to avert nuclear disaster and cope with the unfolding humanitarian crisis in wake of friday's deadly quake. this hour, can a nuclear meltdown be avoided? engineers are more troubled today than ever about that crippled nuclear react or. we talk with congressman ed markey sounding the alarm for stricter safeguards. >>> experts say the big one is coming to california. are the officials there ready. >>> in libya gadhafi forces expand strikes against rebels on the front. secretary of state hillary clinton arrives in paris to talk with european counterparts about imposing a no-fly zone. >>> labor fight. is the challenge over bargaining rights about to head to court? >>> i'm norah o'donnell live in washington. andrea is on assignment. we begin in japan where the humanitarian disaster is compounded by the potential for a nuclear nightmare. 250,000 doses of iodine are being distributed to evacuees as a defense to radiation. it follows explosions at two nuclear reactors, a third is
from okinawa and dozens more transport helicopters have moved up the coast of japan. at least 100 air force personnel are working to restore electricity to an air base near the most effected areas. and the 150-member search and rescue teams from virginia and california that have been called upon in so many tragedies, will be moving out into the stricken towns. an indication just how desperate the japanese are for aid, in the 1995 earthquake there where 6,000 people died, the japanese refused most foreign aid. this time they are accepting aid from even rivals like china and south korea. martha raddatz, abc news, washington. >> that is certainly telling. >>> now, at ground level, as you can imagine, it is hard to exactly take in the size and scope of the destruction in japan. abc's christiane amanpour has a different perspective after taking an aerial tour. >> reporter: with search and rescue under way in the earthquake and tsunami zone, we wondered how much of the country is affected by this kind of chaos and destruction. the helicopters taking on fuel and we're going up to the sendai
said about army and wikileaks that led to his resignation. >> heather: but first, japan's worst crisis since world war ii, that is how they are describing the earthquake. at this hour, the death toll is in the thousands and exact number may never be known. a powerful quake and subs consequent tsunami. the government is working frantically to prevent nuclear meltdowns. greg palkot joins us live north of tokyo from the latest on the recovery efforts. >> reporter: that japanese prime minister went on to say it's going to take the determination of people like the folks in these coastal town in northeastern japan and people throughout the region to deal with the situation. they are getting hit on all fronts. as you noted there is a nuclear catastrophe up the coast from where we are. today we saw another nuclear reactor stricken by the earthquake that hit here on friday. sea water had to be poured into the reactor to cool it down to avoid a full scale meltdown. still evacuation of the region around this nuclear reactor complex continues and the screening for radiation poisoning also continue
disaster in japan. i'm harris falkner, we're live as fox reports with a special edition tonight. a new threat of multiple reactor meltdown and power plant operators using sea water to cool down the reactors. trouble in at least two power plants, the fukushima plant rocked by at least one explosion and the facility where radiations levels were up, but now told they've returned back to normal levels. japan's prime minister talking about the disaster the tsunami disaster and his words through a translator. >> in the 65 years since theened of world war ii, this is the toughest, the most difficult for japan in the period. >> harris: want to put up on the screen the newly released satellite images. and this is sendai, the epicenter of the quake. before and after. before on the left side, after on the right. that is before the tsunami driven mud and ripping out so much of the coastline on the right-hand side and the government confirming more than 2500 buildings in that coastal city destroyed. the earthquake's magnitude now elevated, scientists estimating a bigger magnitude, stronger, 9.0 is
and thousands more may still be buried and japan's economy is reeling. overnight the nikkei index has lost 10% of its value. since this time yesterday. explosions, fires, a possible meltdown in several of the reactors. even nuclear experts say this crisis is rapidly descending into unchartered territory. we are joined by stan grant in tokyo. what is going on now, stan? what exactly is the japanese government saying? >> reporter: carol, this takes twists and turns almost by the hour, let alone by the day. let me focus in on two things that occurred today. an explosion in the number two reactor. there are concerns this may have caused some damage to the containment vessel and that is important in the case of a full meltdown because that is the last line of defense in keeping in the nastier radiation inside the plant and not seeping into the atmosphere. a fire then in reactor number four. what appears to have happened in this disabled reactor so much heat generated that a pool of water in which there was spent fuel rods evaporated. the fuel rods according to an trs company here may have ignited
>>> coming up next on eyewitness news, deadly disaster, new concerns of a nuclear meltdown in japan, while that country is still reeling from yesterday's powerful earthquake. >>> many marylanders wait to hear from loved ones in the devastation after the historic earthquake in japan. i'm weijia jiang, hear their story next. >>> game advocates thought 2011 would be their year. we'll explain what is standing in the way of legalizing same-sex marriage. >>> the skies are clear this morning, could we see some warmer weather on the horizon soon? meteorologist tim williams a the answer in his first warning weather forecast. eyewitness news saturday morning starts now. >>> we are getting a look at the scope of the devastation in japan this morning, as a massive rescue effort is underway to find survivors of the disaster that rocked the entire pacific. good morning, welcome to eyewitness news this saturday, i'm gigi barnett. we'll have more on the situation in a moment, but first. >> good morning to you. those pictures and this whole situation is as fascinating as it is horrible. it's one of
dahlgren begins our coverage from japan. >> aid is beginning to trickle in. trying to get help to those desperate for a lifeline. while japanese officials continue their fight to stay ahead, on monday and other hydrogen explosion. this time in the reactor no. 3 at the fukushima daiichi reactor plant. this is increasing fears about its stability. it is a nation struggling on so many fronts and the death toll is a growing. more than 1 million without power, water, and in some places food. tokyo is not the moon -- not immune. there are some heartwarming stories of families reunited. for millions more, it is another heartbreaking night. hundred in shelters and shedding tears for those that have lost. they continued to brace for more aftershocks. >> to my opinion, it has a much greater chance of having a major earthquake or a tsunami. corrections more overwhelming fears. wbal-tv 11 news. >> president obama said the images -- were shocking. >> i said it to the prime minister of japan that the united states will continue to offer any assistance we can as they recover from multiple dis
and worsening nuclear crisis in japan. another explosion rocked the fukushima nuclear power plant that is about 170 miles north of tokyo. and it is now feared a third reactor will explode. officials say fuel rods appear to be melting right now in all three troubled reactors. all of this, of course, raising concerns more radiation will be released. the u.s. military moves some of its fleet further from japan's shore after some of the uss ronald reagan carrier group were exposed to a cloud of low-level radiation, this as authorities try to cope with the disaster. officials say another 1,000 bodies washed up today along japan's earthquake and tsunami ravaged northeast coast. so far 2,800 people confirmed dead. but as you well know by now, the final death toll is expected to increase to as many as possibly 10,000 the people. chris jansing joins us live from tokyo regarding the nuclear crisis. at the top of the hour i pointed out a japanese official is saying we are likely seeing melting at the plant that's been so much focused on. >> reporter: what we've had is for a second time a fuel rod explode
concerns are two of japan's nuclear power plants. this is a story we're watching closely. officials say cooling systems in some reactors have failed and some radiation has leaked. more on that angle to the story in just a few moments. >> now our correspondent kyung lah has spent hours trying to make her way to the northern quake zone and joins us now from near sendai, the city heavily damaged by the quake and tsunami. first off, describe the challenge of us of just trying to get to the disaster zone. >> reporter: well, the roads are completely blocked so one of the things that we've been looking for are the stories along the way as we try to make it up to the area that is hardest hit, that area hit by the tsunami, and we found one. this is a city called sirakawa and in this city there is a neighborhood where you can see some of the houses, it really does look like a small little community. you can see the three houses right here. what you can't see behind the three houses are eight houses. those eight houses, more than 24 hours ago, 25 hours ago when that earthquake struck, were complet
this morning. >> in japan engineers want to keep the reactors from melting down. the death toll will crime above 10,000 from the tsunami. >> a sonar sweep shift harbor. a dozen vessels still unaccounted for. >> a live look at downtown san francisco where it looks dry right now but we are still dealing with yesterday's rain that spilled into the morning forecast. talk about how long it will last and how long it will affect that commute. >> the good news if you are taking bart, full service into san francisco, everything back to normal this morning. a live shot of the bay bridge toll plaza. be careful out there. look out for possible ponding. >> thank you for starting your week with us. i'm kristen sze. >> i'm eric thomas. we begin with breaking news. firefighters are on the scene of a house fire on virginia and south first street. they started about an hour and a half ago. the family living inside managed to get out safely and firefighters managed to rescue a dog. they knocked it down but said likely the house is unlivable. they'll be looking for hot spots and trying to find a cause. >> we'
. >> speaking of food and water are in short supply for hundreds of thousands of earthquake survive glors japan, and temperatures are near freezing. rescuers are pulling bodies and some survivors from the mud-covered wreckage of homes and cars. over 1400 people are confirmed dead. one police heave says the toll could top 10,000. >> reporter: with images that speak for themselves, japan's prime minister spoke frankly inch the 65 years after the end of world war ii, this is the toughest, most difficult crisis for japan. sendai and surrounding areas resellle a war zone as troops race to pull the living from the ruins. this man was pulled nine miles out to sea, rescued while floating on his roof top. another man rescued said he refused to die. my thoughts were focused on my family. i decided to make every effort to survive. that anyone survived the tsunami seems a miracle. witnesses say massive walls pouring past barreer, into homes. this woman is pregnant. >> i don't know exactly what's going on. >> reporter: authorities have announced rolling blackouts. lines for water and gas are getting longer,
of the food coming here from japan. we'll have answers for you here tonight. >>> the struggle of those rebels in libya to now get the upper hand as nbc's richard engel lives through a close call on the ground. >>> making a difference. with a combination of medical expertise and a higher power. >>> and a screen gem is gone. some say the last of the true movie stars. tonight we'll remember elizabeth taylor. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. we're still in the middle of an air assault on libya. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' headquarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi ton
>>> also, new nuclear concerns in japan that there is a direct connection to the u.s. navy. >>> it's been an anxious morning for some b.a.r.t. comcommuters -- commuters. >>> right now, hundreds of bay area community college students and their supporters are heading north to the state's capitol. "mornings on 2" starts now. >>> well, good morning to you. i'm dave clark. >> i'm tori campbell. it's monday, march 14th. >>> just hours ago, b.a.r.t. took -- took care of one problem. >> sal has more on the coverage. >> what happened? >> the system is running well. allie rasmus has more. >> reporter: well, right now, there are delays of trains coming in san francisco. at the concord station. that brought the strain line and traffic to a complete standstill. news chopper 2 was overhead when it happened. b.a.r.t. officials still don't know why that derailment happened. crews worked overnight to remove the derailed tank -- train. at 4:00 a.m. this morning, the work was complete and selves was restored. back out here live, there were delays. when we talked to commuters this morning, they are re
how hhlping japan now ... is really just returning a favor. good morning joel d. good morning patrice, (ad lib for a link to the 3 patrice, (ad lib for a link to the aaerican red cross of central maryland juss foxbaltimmre dot com lash morning. japanese engineers are geeting help from mmryland.a professor from johns hopkins is headdd to japan this month to help &pinspect the damage to buildings in the areas hardest hit by the earthquaae andd tsunami. since he was born and raised in japan, he ssys he's happy but he's concerned about the devastationncaused by multiple disaaters. <"the earthquakes are ground-shaking... one since japan uge force."> improved its building codess back in the 1980's... most modern buildings are earthhuake-prrof.... but they wwre not designed toowithstand thousands gather at the state house to rally against thh governor's pension reform proposal.michael buczynnr says were there to protest and make thier voices heard. heard. just days after 3 3 just days after igning his budget repair bill...wisconsii governor scott walker comes face o faceewith protestor
>>> this morning on "early today," high anxiety. japan pulls emergency workers from its crippled nuclear power plant after a surge in radiation. >>> dealing with disaster, a new study reveals how prepared is the u.s. to deal with a major nuclear emergency. >>> and ways of power, newly surfaced video shows the force of friday's tsunami as it hits surfaced video shows the force of friday's tsunami as it hits the oregon coastline. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry. today, we begin with melting point. a skeleton crew working to prevent an all-out meltdown at the fukushima nuclear plant were forced out of the facility for nearly an hour today following a dangerous spike in radiation that authorities feared put their lives at risk. nbc chief science correspondent robert bazelle reports from tokyo. >> authorities here in japan say they have been serious problems again at the nuclear power plant, particularly in unit number three, which has been sort of kwieette for a while. it was a sharp spike in radiation. it was so sharp, the wor
are still feeling after shocks, including chris barnes, a u.s. student studying in japan and joins us now on the phone. can you hear me. >> i can hear you, kelly, good afternoon. >> kelly: you sound loud and clear. good afternoon to you as well. you're still feeling after shocks there? >> indeed i am. we've been having aftershocks, two to three an hour, since the first quake struck. >> kelly: where are you staying right now, trent? >> at the moment i'm in tokoyo, in my apartment on top of my building on the 12th floor and i would say compared to the ground floor, the shaking is stronger up here. >> kelly: you can feel the swaying and it's got to make you feel uncomfortable? >> well, look, i grew up in los angeles and i experienced the 1994 north ridge earthquake and it absolutely pales in pair son, the north ridge earthquake compared to what i experienced in tokoyo. >> kelly: how many people here in the united states recall the north ridge earthquake in 1994. as you were saying and this one is far worse. and we've seen the devastation hereof the tsunami. were you a witness to any of that?
part in a protest. >>> confusion today in japan about the damaged nuclear power plant. more pools of radioactive water were found inside and the owners gave widely conflicting accounts about the danger. that only heightened concerns that the crisis has been mishandled. lee cowan is in tokyo. >> reporter: it was the second apology in as many days. and just the most recent example of late or flat-out erroneous information coming from the owners of japan's stricken nuclear power plant. >> tokyo electric power company says it needs to revise its announcement. >> reporter: tepco officials reported radiation levels near a pool of one of the reactors were 10 million times the normal level. workers were evacuated and news reports were full of fears the crisis only deepened. for all the alarm bells the news set off, sets out tepco says it was wrong. the radiation level in that pool and three other pools was high, but not the astronomical level first described. tepco apologized for what it called an inconvenience. but it was an inconvenience no one here needed. those in the hardest-hit area
, for continuing coverage. captioning by, closed captioning services, inc. >> eric: a "fox news alert," could japan be teetering on the edge of a nuclear disaster, reeling from the devastating earthquake and tsunami? the nuclear concerns are bringing new worries, this morning that the crisis in the country could get worse and there could be another big earthquake. hello, i'm eric sean, on this busy sunday morning. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby. japan's prime minister is now calling the crisis there, one of the worst since the endf world war ii. they are worried about possible melt downs and potential for an explosion at nuclear reactors, along the northeast earn coast. and, more than 170,000 people evacuating the area, where authorities fear now more than 10,000 people have already died from the quake and a wall of water that rushed right through. david piper on the ground, streaming live with the latest from tokyo. david, give us the latest. what is the situation, with the nuclear scare? >> reporter: well, jamie, there's a real fear that there could be a nuclear melted down, the latest we have is the
. >>> we are continuing to follow the breaking news of the major earthquake in japan where a tsunami has flooded the northeast and more than 50 countries in the pacific on alert for a tsunami including the west coast of the u.s. and canada. in the last hour, tsunami warning sirens have been going off in hawaii bracing for a tidal we've. the 8.9 earthquake one of the biggest to hit japan. the prime minister there calling for calm. the government calling for international assistance and the u.s. ambassador in japan says the united states is ready to help. >>> we'll continue to monitor that throughout the morning. i'm gurvir dhindsa. >> i'm steve chenevey. tucker barnes with us here with a look at our forecast as we get things moving on a friday morning. >> good morning. much improvement today after last night got very interesting. we had severe thunderstorm warnings, a lot of heavy rain. all of that oust here and now we are looking at some sunshine. >> that will be good. >> quieter weather and spring- like conditions around here. we've been promising it all week. by tomorrow, it will be ab
on traffic pulse 11. back to you. >> thank you. experts are calling the nuclear crisis in japan a slower-moving nightmare. >> the buildup of radiation was too much. tracie potts has the latest from japan and reaction in the u.s. >> the last 50 workers fled the nuclear plant to escape a huge burst of radiation. >> they have to continue to try. >> officials say 70% of the fuel rods are damaged. 107 miles away in tokyo, residents are leaving despite the surge is that radiation levels are not yet harmful. >> low levels now but we do not know what it will be like tomorrow. is back upnikkei today. >> uncertainty has taken over the markets right now. >> , response the nuclear regulatory commission to explain if our nuclear plants could withstand a 9.0 earthquake. >> we have to make sure that all the bad actors in the industry are sorted out very quickly. >> the government continues to assure americans that radiation levels here are safe. but that has not stopped their run of potassium iodide. one retailer says he has a backlog of 3000 orders. tracie potts, wbal-tv 11 news. >> many of us in the
countries like japan -- excuse me -- china and india. there is not a lot of overlap in those the use -- those views. you have an opportunity to agree with steve and me to come back where we can -- to come back to where we can get things done. you can make the case in a practical sense of what difference transit and your investment has made in your community, what difference it makes in terms of the fabric of the community, the environment, being able to deal with social equity. you have a case to make. i am proud of what we have done in portland, oregon over the last 30 years. transit made it possible for portland to be the nation's most popular european city. there is a joke about young people going there to retire. but the quality of life is good enough that people feel like they are retiring. we have an opportunity to stress in our downtown, our neighboring community. we give people transportation choices. there has been spectacular re- investment that would not have been possible had it not been for transit. we need you to advocate for what transit means to you now and what it wi
>>> this is fox 5 news at 10:00. >>> explosion at a nuclear power plant in japan, radiation possibly leaking at this hour. crews are scrambling as the death toll from the earthquake and tsunami rises. >>> another big story, new details about a brutal attack at a shopping hotspot, the clue that could help police hunting for two killers on the loose tonight. >>> we'll begin with the looming nuclear threat in japan, a third explosion rocking a damaged power plant. i'm brian bolter. >> and i'm shawn yancy. more than 2,400 people confirmed dead, thousands more missing as rescuers continue sifting through debris. fox 5's laura evans is following the developing details from the newsroom. >> while people on japan's east coast deal with the death and devastation the new clear threat grows tonight. you mentioned the latest explosion at the fukushima nuclear power plant and tonight officials suspect a container may be damaged. radiation may be leaking. one woman who lives near the plant said it's like a horror movie. this is perhaps one of the greatest catastrophes this country has kno
to start leaving japan, they can. >> wolf blitzer traveling with the secretary of state, thank you so much. we know that american companies have already started doing this, getting their employees out, moving their employees and their families in some cases and people who have been working in tokyo, now working in other cities further south, getting their families out of the country. we know companies have started doing this. >> many in the airport trying to get out. that does it for us. >> "cnn newsroom" with carol costello starts right now. >> happy st. patrick's day day to you guys, too. 9:00 a.m. on the east coast and 6:00 a.m. on the west. helicopters and fire trucks move in and pour water on an overheating reactor site. the latest desperate attempt to reduce radiation levels at the damaged nuclear plant and, so far, it appears to be failing. >>> the u.s. begins vaticevacua families of diplomatic staff and help other americans get out of the area as well. >>> in the meantime, the death toll from the earthquake and tsunami is rising yet again. the latest numbers, more than 5,400 people
, and los angeles are joining rescuers from japan and other countries. highly drained dogs are able to detect live victims who might be buried in the debris. the teams land the at a u.s. air base about 150 miles north of sendai. >>> the nuclear fears from this crisis in japan are only raising concerns here in the u.s. what if such a disaster ever hit us here at home? david kerley has more on that. >> reporter: japan had never declared a nuclear emergency. it is dealing with six runaway reactors. two in dire shape. >> two reactors now where we have core that is partially melted. this is unprecedented. >> reporter: the good news, inside those buildings, the hot nuclear cores and their primary containment housings are said to be intact. but with no electricity, the japanese are reportedly using firetrucks, taking the drastic step of pumping sea water into the cores and flooding the containment housings of both reactors. a last-ditch effort to cool the cores to stop the nuclear reaction. >> we are at a reactor tipping point. either over the next 24 to 48 hours they'll get coal of these
, japan's prime minister is calling it the worst crisis since world war two as rescue workers search for survivors from the earthquake and tsunami that hit japan. officials what red cross to the magnitude of the damage is not known, 2000 people >> reporter: justice said japan and other very dark, cold night. there follows what was an extremely difficult day for survivors, rescuers and the country as a whole. but days after the largest earthquake on record life is anything but normal. some headed back to work but were left stranded due to pirated, and downed trees. news from the disaster continues to be grim. reports of 2000 bodies discovered off the coast. >> 65 years after the end of war were to this is the tempest, most difficult crisis for japan. >> reporter: the destruction is a one- dimensional. insensate 80 mi. from the epicenter loads of homes of latin, reduce stress. lives, strewn about. on the ground, from the air surest and rescue teams look for survivors they find few miracles. washed away by the tsunami this woman house of to retreat, a floor mat for hours until hall ar
might be helping you if you are looking for ways to help the victims in japan. we set up a phone bank this morning to make sure you have an easy way to donate to organizations helping in the recovery efforts in japan. call the number on your screen, 202-895-3307. again the number is 202-895- 3307. we have representatives from the adventist development and relief agency, the baptist world alliance, the salvation army, world vision and the universal relief team. when you call, your organization will go to the charity who answers the phone unless you specify a specific charity. >>> and first let's look at our forecast with tony. >> hi, allison and good morning, everybody. i told you we would have partial sunshine this morning and we do. we will see changing conditions during the course of the day. more clouds later and rainfall too. let's look at hd radar and the rain is a ways away. we have a mix of clouds and sun. sunrise i think occurs at 7:20 this morning. so the rain is not nearby. later on i think we could see a few rain showers develop during the course of the afternoon but the mo
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